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We need your help engaging the community to vote!

Since 2002, NaFFAA’s non-partisan civic engagement program, “FilAm Vote”, has aimed to unite, build, and increase political empowerment through five main components:

Voter Registration

Increase the number of eligible Filipino American voters.

Voter Education

Filipino Americans will learn the issues that affect their everyday lives.

Voter Protection

Should be explained thoroughly to avoid voter intimidation.

Get Out the Vote

Filipino Americans will turn out on election day.

Running for Public Office

Supporting Filipino American running for elected office.

FilAm Vote Vision Statement:

NaFFAA FilAm Vote Program envisions a society where Filipino Americans are included, heard, and represented in the decision-making process at the local, state and national level in the political arena united with one voice.

FilAm Vote Mission Statement:

NaFFAA FilAm Vote Program’s mission is to promote the development of political leadership and build public policy knowledge to strengthen and fill the political pipeline for Filipino Americans pursuing public office at the local, state, and federal levels.

Why should I vote?

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Voting is your chance to choose how your tax dollars are spent – such as funding for health care and social services.

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Support the candidates and ballot measures that can help your community, state, and even the nation for the greater good. Make your voice heard in these elections.

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Absentee voting (aka “mail-in voting” and “by-mail voting”) is conducted by mail-in ballot before the day of Election Day. All states will mail a ballot to voters if certain conditions are met.

FilAm Voter Resources

Looking for resources to support the FilAmVote efforts in your community? Use the links below!

FilAm Vote Graphics Resources

Register to Vote

APIAVote Tagalog Information

Request An Absentee Ballot

How To Vote In Your State

Check Your Voter Registration Status

Frequently Asked Question

Voter registration deadlines vary in each state. Check with your county / state board of elections / secretary of state’s office.

The age requirement varies by each state. Check with your state’s board of elections/secretary of state’s office.

Registration requirements vary state to state, so make sure to check your own state’s rules https://www.fairelectionscenter.org/ A number of state even allow pre-registration before you turn 18.

Yes. You must be a naturally born or fully naturalized U.S. citizen in order to register to vote. Registration requirements vary state to state, so make sure to check your own state’s rules https://www.fairelectionscenter.org/

Yes, if you have changed our address, changed your name, or need to change your political party, you must re-register. Check with your state’s board of elections/secretary of state’s office for requirements in your state.

Check for changes to Early Voting, Voter ID requirements, evening or weekend voting hours, same day registration at www.apiavote.org/states

Yes! You have the right to register to vote at your school address – this includes a dorm room. Any student living in a dorm is entitled to the same rights as any other student. To imply otherwise is illegal. If you receive mail in a Post Office box you can sign an affidavit (or, in some cases, get a letter from your college’s Residential Life office) asserting that you live at your dorm address.

Contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.  They develop and provide online tools to assist US citizens living anywhere in the world to register to vote and request their absentee ballot using their state’s specific voter forms. This includes US citizens living within the US, living abroad or serving in the military. The rules for people in the armed forces or abroad are different than people living in the United States.

Contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.  They develop and provide online tools to assist US citizens living anywhere in the world to register to vote and request their absentee ballot using their state’s specific voter forms. This includes US citizens living within the US, living abroad or serving in the military. The rules for people in the armed forces or abroad are different than people living in the United States.

Check with your state’s board of elections/secretary of state’s office. There may be a certain number of days before the person can register. A state cannot require the resident to live in the state for more than 30 days in order to register.

No. Your form will not be processed if you put a P.O. Box as your permanent address. For districting purposes you must put a physical address. There is a section of the form to put your mailing address, in addition to your physical address.